A new guide to promising perovskite materials: The Perovskite Handbook

The Spintronics-Info team takes pleasure in recommending our new book - The Perovskite Handbook. This book gives a comprehensive introduction to perovskite materials, applications and industry. Perovskites offer a myriad of exciting properties and has great potential for several industry -including the spintronics one.

The Perovskite Handbook

We believe that any spintronics professional would find that perovskite materials are an area of focus that should not be ignored. The promising perovskite industry is currently at a tipping point and on the verge of mass adoption and commercialization and the first display-related perovskites are already reaching the market.

Perovskites are promising as spintronic materials, researchers develop two new perovskite spintronics devices

Researchers from the University of Utah developed two spintronics devices based on perovskite materials. The researchers use these new devices to demonstrate the high potential of perovksites for spintronics systems. This is a followup to the exciting results announced in 2017 by the same group that showed advantages of perovskites for spintronics.

Perovskite spintronics LED wavelength (Utah University)

The researchers use an organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite material that has a heavy lead atom that features strong spin-orbit coupling and a long injected spin lifetime.The first device is a spintronic LED which works with a magnetic electrode instead of an electron-hole electrode. The perovskite LED lights up with circularly polarized electroluminescence.

Introduction to perovskite materials

Perovskite materials offer exciting properties which make them useful for solar panels, fuel cells, lasers, displays and more. Many believe Perovskites are the future of solar power and some estimate that perovskite adoption is right around the corner. Our new video below gives a short introduction to perovskites:

For more information on perovskites and to stay updated on these exciting materials, check out our Perovskite-Info knowledge hub!

Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are promising spintronics materials

Researchers from the University of Utah demonstrated that organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are a promising material class for spintronics applications. These perovskite materials feature two contradictory properties - easily controlled electron spin and long spin lifetime (up to a nanosecond). This is a unique combination of two highly sought after properties for spintronics devices.

Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite spintronics research (University of Utah)

The specific material used in this research is the hybrid perovskite methyl-ammonium lead iodine (CH3NH3PbI3). In their study, a thin film of this material was placed in front of an ultrafast laser that was used to set the electron's spin orientation and also observe the spin precession.

Will perovskites hold the key to spin-based quantum computing?

Researchers from the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), quite accidentally, discovered that perovskite materials, grown using solution processing, exhibit the optical Stark effect at room temperatures.

The NREL team used the Stark effect to remove the degeneracy of the excitonic spin states within the perovskite sample. The optical Stark effect can be used to create promising technologies, including the potential to be used as an ultrafast optical switch. In addition, it can be used to control or address individual spin states, which is needed for spin-based quantum computing.

Will Perovskites be the future of solar cells, batteries, sensors, lasers and displays?

Spintronics-Info takes great pride in inviting its readers to check out Perovskite-Info.com, our new site focused on perovskite developments, applications and market. We treat it with the same amount of care and deliberation as our other sites, to bring you only the best and most up-to-date picture of the happenings in the field.

Perovskites are a fascinating group of materials that share a similar structure and display a myriad of exciting properties like superconductivity, magnetoresistance and more. These easily synthesized materials are considered the future of solar cells, as their distinctive structure makes them perfect for enabling low-cost, efficient photovoltaics. They are also predicted to play a role in next-gen electric vehicle batteries, sensors, displays, lasers and much more.

Manganites can change its stripes from fluctuating to static and back

Manganites are compounds of manganese oxides which are feature colossal magnetoresistance - and are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Researchers from the University of Colorado discovered that 2D bilayer manganite (a lanthanum strontium manganese oxide) can change its stripes from fluctuating to static and back. Magnatide stripe are regions where where the material’s electrical charges gather and concentrate. Other so-called correlated-electron materials also have stripes, including many high-temperature superconductors having the same crystal structure: arrangements of layers of atoms named for the mineral perovskite.

Manganite stripes photo

The results mean that the material can switch from a metallic state (a conductor) to an insulator. This is the first good insight into what happens to the electronic properties of a material when stripes 'fluctuate'. It establishes the existence of a distinct new phase of the material, which the researchers call fluctuating bi-stripes.