Spintronics-Info: the spintronics experts

Spintronics-Info is a news hub and knowledge center born out of keen interest in spintronic technologies.

Spintronics is the new science of computers and memory chips that are based on electron spin rather than (or in addition to) the charge (used in electronics). Spintronics is an exciting field that holds promise to build faster and more efficient computers and other devices.

Recent spintronics News

Video lecture - Spin Conversion Phenomena in Spintronics

The UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL) published this video of a lecture by Yoshi Chika Otani from Japan's RIKEN and the University of Tokyo titled "Spin Conversion Phenomena in Spintronics"

The lecture covers all the recently discovered conversion phenomena, such as the direct and inverse spin Hall effects, spin Seebeck and Peltier effects, spin pumping, and the inverse Faraday effect.

Introduction to perovskite materials

Perovskite materials offer exciting properties which make them useful for solar panels, fuel cells, lasers, displays and more. Many believe Perovskites are the future of solar power and some estimate that perovskite adoption is right around the corner. Our new video below gives a short introduction to perovskites:

For more information on perovskites and to stay updated on these exciting materials, check out our Perovskite-Info knowledge hub!

Zero-Field Switching effect discovered in cobalt-iron-boron

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the US NIST discovered that magnetisation in a cobalt-iron-boron layer could be flipped between stable states using only electric current, without an external magnetic field. The researchers call this effect Zero-Field Switching (ZFS).

ZFE in cobalt-iron-boron layer (JHU / NIST)

The researchers say that this effect was not theoretically predicted, as all previous devices of this type have required a magnetic field or other more complex measures to change the material's magnetisation.

Researchers develop a Magnon Spin Valve

Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the University of Konstanz and Tohoku University developed a spin-valve structure based on several ferromagnets - which can detect the efficiency of magnon currents depending on the magnetic configuration of the device.

Magnon Spin valve (Tohoku JGU)

The researchers say that this is a new "building block" for Magnon Spintronics, and this kind of device could be used to the transmission or blocking of incoming spin information.

Spin Caloritronics explored for DNA molecules

Spin caloritronics is a new emerging field that explores how heat currents transport electron spin. One interesting application in this field is the use of waste heat to create spintronics devices that do not require any external power to operate.

dsDNA sandwiched between a nonmagnetic metal (NM) and a ferromagnet (FM) one (photo: CUMT)

The thermally driven transport application of spin caloritronics is based on the Seebeck effect - which takes use of the temperature difference between a ferromagnet (FM) and a nonmagnetic metal (NM) to create a thermoelectric voltage.

Researchers from MIPT design a new spin diode

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) designed a new spin diode, using two kinds of antiferromagnetic materials. The researchers say that this new design features triple the frequencies range under which the device can rectify alternating currents, while keeping the same sensitivity as semiconductor-based diodes.

Spin Diode Design (MIPT)

The spin diode, in this new design, is placed between the two materials, and by adjusting the orientation of their antiferromagnetic axes, it is possible to change the resistance and the resonant frequency of the diode.

Researchers produce controllable and stable skyrmions using ultra-short laser pulses

Researchers from the EPFL managed to produce controllable and stable skyrmions using laser pulses. The scientists could write and erase skyrmions in less than a few hundred nanoseconds to a few microseconds.

To create the skyrmions, the researchers used iron-germanium alloy, which can offer skyrmions at about 0 degrees Celsius, very closet o room temperature. The ultra-short laser pulses create an ultra-fast temperature jump, and the super-cooling effect at the end of the jump restricts the place in which skyrmions exist - to places in which they do not exist normally.