Spintronics-Info: the spintronics experts

Spintronics-Info is a news hub and knowledge center born out of keen interest in spintronic technologies.

Spintronics is the new science of computers and memory chips that are based on electron spin rather than (or in addition to) the charge (used in electronics). Spintronics is an exciting field that holds promise to build faster and more efficient computers and other devices.

Recent spintronics News

Iron Oxide was found to be a promising magnon spintronics material

Researchers from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, in cooperation with Utrecht University and the Center for Quantum Spintronics (QuSpin) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), demonstrated that the antiferromagnetic material iron oxide is a promising magnon spintronics material.

An electrical current in a platinum wire creates a magnetic wave in the antiferromagnetic iron oxide

Iron oxide is a cheap material (it is the main material in rusted iron) that was shown to be able to carry magnon over long distances, with low access heat. For their demonstration, the researchers used used platinum wires on top of the insulating iron oxide. An electric current was introduced which led to the creation of magnons in the iron oxide.

BiSb films feature a colossal spin hall effect and high electrical conductivity

Researchers from the Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a new thin film material made from bismuth-antimony (BiSb) that is a topological insulator that simultaneously achieves a colossal spin Hall effect and high electrical conductivity.

This material could be used as the basis of spin-orbit torque MRAM (SOT-MRAM). SOT-MRAM SOT-MRAM can overcome the limitation of spin-transfer torque in MRAM memories - and provide a much faster, denser and much more efficient memory technology. Up until now, though, no suitable material that features both high electrical conductivity and a high spin hall effect was developed.

Researchers find multi-layered Co/Ni films highly desirable materials for effective spin transfer torque

Researchers from the University of Lorraine in France report that following a comprehensive characterization of multilayers of cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni), the material holds great promise for memory applications based on spin transfer torque (STT-MRAM).

Multi layered cobalt and nickel films for spintronics

It was already shown before that Co/Ni multilayers have very good properties for spintronics applications, but up until now it wasn't clear if the films have a sufficiently large intrinsic spin polarization, which is necessary to create and maintain spin-polarized currents in spintronic devices. It was now shown that the films have a spin polarization of about 90% - which is similar to the best spintronic materials.

Researchers develop an all-electric method to measure the spin texture of topological insulators

Researchers from Singapore's NUS and the University of Missouri developed a new all-electric method to measure the spin texture of topological insulators. The researchers say that this method could lead to an easier (and cheaper) methods of developing spintronics devices.

Spin Texture measurements of Topological Insulators (NUS)

The new work revealed a close relation between the spin texture of topological surface states (TSS) and a new kind of magneto-resistance. The researchers observed the second order nonlinear magneto-resistance in a prototypical 3D TI Bi2Se3 films, and showed that it is sensitive to TSS. In contrast with conventional magneto-resistances, this new magneto-resistance shows a linear dependence on both the applied electric and magnetic fields.