Spintronics-Info: the spintronics experts

Spintronics-Info is a news hub and knowledge center born out of keen interest in spintronic technologies.

Spintronics is the new science of computers and memory chips that are based on electron spin rather than (or in addition to) the charge (used in electronics). Spintronics is an exciting field that holds promise to build faster and more efficient computers and other devices.

Recent spintronics News

New platform realizes ultra-strong photon-to-magnon coupling

A team of scientists from NUST MISIS and MIPT have developed a new platform for realization of ultra-strong photon-to-magnon coupling. The proposed system is on-chip and is based on thin-film hetero-structures with superconducting, ferromagnetic and insulating layers.

This achievement addresses a problem that has been on the agenda of research teams for the last 10 years, and opens new opportunities in implementing quantum technologies.

Inducing and tuning spin interactions in layered material

A China-Australia collaboration has, for the first time, illustrated that Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI), an antisymmetric exchange vital for forming various chiral spin textures such as skyrmions, can be induced in a layered material tantalum-sulfide (TaS2) by intercalating iron atoms, and can further be tuned by gate-induced proton intercalation.

Magnetic-spin interactions that allow spin-manipulation by electrical control allow potential applications in energy-efficient spintronic devices.

Researchers find a key cause of energy loss in spintronic materials

A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has found a property of magnetic materials that may enable engineers to develop more efficient spintronic devices in the future.

One of the main obstacles to developing better spintronic devices is an effect called “damping,” which is where the magnetic energy essentially escapes from the materials, making them less efficient. Traditionally, scientists have ascribed this property to the interaction between the electron’s spin and its motion. However, the team led by the University of Minnesota has proven that there is another factor – magnetoelastic coupling, i.e. the interaction between electron spin or magnetism and sound particles.

Researchers find way to control spin waves using light in an insulating material formed by magnetic layers

An international research team, including scientists from the Institute of Molecular Science of the University of Valencia (ICMol), has discovered how to control spin waves using light in an insulating material formed by magnetic layers. This could be a step towards a new generation of devices that store and transport information in a highly efficient way and with very low consumption.

If throwing a stone into a pond generates a wave that propagates over the surface of the water, something similar happens when the action of a magnet or a pulse of light, for example, propagates over a magnetic material – made up of small magnets (spines) connected to each other – and produces what is known as a ‘spin wave’.

“Bite” defects revealed in graphene nanoribbons

Two recent studies by a collaborative team of scientists from two NCCR MARVEL labs have identified a new type of defect as the most common source of disorder in on-surface synthesized graphene nanoribbons (GNRs).

Combining scanning probe microscopy with first-principles calculations allowed the researchers to identify the atomic structure of these so-called "bite" defects and to investigate their effect on quantum electronic transport in two different types of graphene nanoribbon. They also established guidelines for minimizing the detrimental impact of these defects on electronic transport and proposed defective zigzag-edged nanoribbons as suitable platforms for certain applications in spintronics.

Researchers report ultrastrong magnon–magnon coupling dominated by antiresonant interactions

A discovery in the spintronics-based quantum technology field started when slightly misaligned orthoferrite crystals (iron oxide crystals with the addition of one or more rare-earth elements) turned up at a Rice University laboratory.

Rice physicist Junichiro Kono, alumnus Takuma Makihara and their collaborators found an orthoferrite material, in this case yttrium iron oxide, placed in a high magnetic field showed uniquely tunable, ultrastrong interactions between magnons in the crystal. Magnons are quasiparticles, constructs that represent the collective excitation of electron spin in a crystal lattice.

Researchers observe chiral-spin rotation of non-collinear antiferromagnets

Researchers at Tohoku University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have reported a new spintronic phenomenon – a persistent rotation of chiral-spin structure.

The researchers studied the response of chiral-spin structure of a non-collinear antiferromagnet Mn3Sn thin film to electron spin injection and found that the chiral-spin structure shows persistent rotation at zero magnetic field. Moreover, their frequency can be tuned by the applied current.