Spin Caloritronics explored for DNA molecules

Spin caloritronics is a new emerging field that explores how heat currents transport electron spin. One interesting application in this field is the use of waste heat to create spintronics devices that do not require any external power to operate.

dsDNA sandwiched between a nonmagnetic metal (NM) and a ferromagnet (FM) one (photo: CUMT)

The thermally driven transport application of spin caloritronics is based on the Seebeck effect - which takes use of the temperature difference between a ferromagnet (FM) and a nonmagnetic metal (NM) to create a thermoelectric voltage.

Researchers from MIPT design a new spin diode

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) designed a new spin diode, using two kinds of antiferromagnetic materials. The researchers say that this new design features triple the frequencies range under which the device can rectify alternating currents, while keeping the same sensitivity as semiconductor-based diodes.

Spin Diode Design (MIPT)

The spin diode, in this new design, is placed between the two materials, and by adjusting the orientation of their antiferromagnetic axes, it is possible to change the resistance and the resonant frequency of the diode.

Researchers produce controllable and stable skyrmions using ultra-short laser pulses

Researchers from the EPFL managed to produce controllable and stable skyrmions using laser pulses. The scientists could write and erase skyrmions in less than a few hundred nanoseconds to a few microseconds.

To create the skyrmions, the researchers used iron-germanium alloy, which can offer skyrmions at about 0 degrees Celsius, very closet o room temperature. The ultra-short laser pulses create an ultra-fast temperature jump, and the super-cooling effect at the end of the jump restricts the place in which skyrmions exist - to places in which they do not exist normally.

Researchers develop a magnons-based spin transistor

Researchers from the University of Groningen developed a spin transistor based on magnons (spin-waves). This transistor allows the researchers to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet - with only an electrical current.

Magnon transistor schematics (Groningen University)

To create the transistor, the researchers used films of platinum that inject magnons into a magnet made of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). A third platinum strip, inserted between the injector and detector allows the researchers to either inject additional magnons in the conduction channel or drain magnons from it.

Researchers modify graphene to make the material both magnetic and with spin-orbit interaction

Researchers from Russia, Germany and Spain managed to modify graphene to make the material both magnetic and with spin-orbit interaction, for the first time. This could make graphene suitable for quantum computers.

Graphene with the properties of cobalt and gold image

To achieve these new properties, the researchers combined graphene with gold and cobalt. The spin-orbit interaction, unlike in gold, is extremely small in graphene. The interaction between graphene and gold increases the spin-orbit interaction in graphene, while interaction between graphene and cobalt induced magnetism.

Researchers manage to connect magnetic porphyrin molecules to graphene nanoribbons

Reserachers from Spain's nanoGUNE Cooperative Research Center (CIC) developed a method to connect magnetic porphyrin molecules to graphene nanoribbons. These connections may be an example of how graphene could enable the potential of molecular electronics.

magnetic porphyrin molecule is connected to a GNR image

Magnetic Porphyrin, a molecule that is responsible for making photosynthesis possible in plants and transporting oxygen in the blood, is an interesting spintronics material. The researchers now report that even after injecting electronic currents into the Porphyrin via the graphene wires, the molecule maintains its magnetic property. Small variations in the way the graphene nanoribbons are attached to a molecule can alter its magnetic properties - and the molecule's spin can be manipulated via the injected currents.