Researchers incorporate an antiferromagnetic layer in an MTJ for the first time

Researchers from the University of Arizona discovered that in common Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJ), there's a thin (2D) layer of Iron Oxide. This layer was found to act as a contaminant which lowers the performance achieved by MTJs.

Magnetic Tunnel Junction schematic (UArizona)

This Iron Oxide layer, however, can also be seen as a blessing - the researchers discovered that the layer behaves as a so-called antiferromagnet at extremely cold temperatures (below -245 degrees Celsius). Antiferromagnets are promising as these can be manipulated at Terahertz frequencies, about 1,000 times faster than existing, silicon-based technology. This is the first research that shows how Antiferromagnets can be controlled as part of MTJs.

Researchers receive grant to develop next-generation highly efficient spintronics-based AI hardware

Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark received a EUR 4.4 million grant from the EU FET to develop novel spintronics-based AI hardware. The researcher say that their suggested design can end up having 100,000 times the performance of the state-of-the-art AI systems of today.

SpinAge spintronics hardware poster

The project, called SpinAge, will revolve around a neuromorphic computer system (NCS) design that is unique, scalable and highly energy efficient (the researchers estimate that the new design will be more efficient than current designs by at least a factor of 100). The synaptic neurons in this system will be based on spintronics technology.

NUS researchers identify the semimetal MoTe2 as a promising spintronics material

Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified a promising spintronics candidate material - few-layer thin semimetal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2).

Planar Spin Hall Effect observed in MoTe2 (NUS)

Semimetals feature material properties that are between metals and semiconductors. The researchers found that an extremely thin (few-layers, almost 2D) MoTe2 features an intrinsic Spin Hall Effect (SHE).

Oakland University professors gets a $500,000 reward to research quantum spintronics

Dr. Wei Zhang, an assistant professor of physics at Oakland University, has earned the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development Program Award and a $500,000 grant over five years to study quantum spintronics.

Quantum spintronics, a relatively new field, studies how a material’s quantum properties (either natural or engineered) could be used to advance future spintronics devices. The grant funding will help facilitate the development of new quantum spintronic laboratory modules at the university, as well as outreach and education activities.

Researchers develop a simple MRAM structure based on unidirectional spin hall magnetoresistance (USMR)

Researchers from the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a new MRAM cell structure that relies on unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance (USMR). The new cell structure is reportedly very simple with only two layers which could lead to lower-cost MRAM devices.

USMR MRAM cell structure image

The spin Hall effect leads to the accumulation of electrons with a certain spin on the lateral sides of a material. By combining a topological insulator with a ferromagnetic semiconductor, the researchers managed to create a device with giant USMR.

Researchers develop single molecular spin switches

Researchers from Kiel University and European colleagues designed and fabricated single molecular spin switches. The newly developed molecules feature stable spin states and do not lose their functionality upon adsorption on surfaces.

Single molecular spin switches (Kiel University)

The researchers say that the spin states of the new compounds are stable for at least several days. The new molecules have three properties that are coupled with each other in such a feedback loop: their shape (planar or flat), the proximity of two subunits, called coordination (yes or no), and the spin state (high-spin or low-spin). Thus, the molecules are locked either in one or the other state. Upon sublimation and deposition on a silver surface, the switches self-assemble into highly ordered arrays. Each molecule in such an array can be separately addressed with a scanning tunneling microscope and switched between the states by applying a positive or negative voltage.