Memory - Page 2

Researchers demonstrate electrical creation and control of antiferromagnetic vortices

Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Diamond Light Source, Czech Academy of Sciences and The University of New South Wales have shown for the first time how electrical creation and control of magnetic vortices in an antiferromagnet can be achieved, a discovery that could increase the data storage capacity and speed of next generation devices.

The team used magnetic imaging techniques to map the structure of newly formed magnetic vortices and demonstrate their back-and-forth movement due to alternating electrical pulses. 

Read the full story Posted: May 17,2023

Researchers use lasers to get closer to realizing spin-based transistors

Researchers have found that lasers can generate stable patterns of electron spins in a thin layer of semiconductor material, a discovery that may help lead to advanced spin-based memory and computing. The scientists have revealed that lasers could generate complex stable patterns of electron spins called “spin textures” in thin films of semiconductors. These spin textures could help lead to what may be the holy grail of spintronics, a superefficient spin-based transistor.

The new findings are based on how light has momentum, just as a physical object moving through space does, even though light does not have mass. This means that light shining on an object can exert a force. Whereas the linear momentum of light supplies a push in the direction that light is moving, the angular momentum of light applies torque.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 13,2023

University of Groningen team examines complex oxides for next-gen computing

Materials scientists from the University of Groningen describe in two separate papers how complex oxides can be used to create very energy-efficient magneto-electric spin-orbit (MESO) devices and memristive devices with reduced dimensions.

The big challenges in next-gen microchips design are to design chips that are more energy efficient and to design devices that combine memory and logic (memristors). Tamalika Banerjee, Professor of Spintronics of Functional Materials at the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, is looking at a range of quantum materials to create new devices. "Our approach is to study these materials and their interfaces, but always with an eye on applications, such as memory or the combination of memory and logic".

Read the full story Posted: Mar 08,2023

MIT team reports new method to control atomic nuclei as 'qubits'

Researchers at MIT have proposed a new approach to making qubits and controlling them to read and write data. The method, which is theoretical at this stage, is based on measuring and controlling the spins of atomic nuclei, using beams of light from two lasers of slightly different colors. 

Nuclear spins have long been recognized as potential building blocks for quantum-based information processing and communications systems, and so have photons, the elementary particles that are discreet packets, or "quanta," of electromagnetic radiation. But coaxing these two quantum objects to work together was difficult because atomic nuclei and photons barely interact, and their natural frequencies differ by six to nine orders of magnitude. In the new process developed by the MIT team, the difference in the frequency of an incoming laser beam matches the transition frequencies of the nuclear spin, nudging the nuclear spin to flip a certain way.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 16,2023

Researchers demonstrate ultrafast coherent control of a skyrmion crystal

Researchers at Switzerland EPFL, China's Anhui University, Germany's University of Cologne and University of New Hampshire in the US have developed a technique that can visualize and control the rotation of a handful of spins arranged in a vortex-like texture at the fastest speed ever achieved. The breakthrough can advance spintronics devices like computer memory, logic gates, and high-precision sensors.

"The visualization and deterministic control of very few spins has not yet been achieved at the ultrafast timescales," says Dr. Phoebe Tengdin, a postdoc at EPFL, pointing out the very tight timeframes that this control needs to happen for spintronics to ever make the leap into applications. Now, the team developed a new technique that can visualize and control the rotation of a handful of spins arranged in a vortex-like texture, a kind of spin "nano-whirlpool" called a skyrmion.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 28,2023

Researchers suggest method to improve the processing of antiferromagnetic devices for spintronic memory technologies

A team led by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the University of South Florida (USF), Harvey-Mudd College and the University of the District of Columbia has discovered a route toward reducing the sputter damage during growth of Nanolayered Pt/Co/Ir-based Synthetic Antiferromagnets that delivers significant improvements in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and interlayer exchange coupling energy.

Synthetic antiferromagnets (SAFs) are a core component for top-pinned magnetic tunnel junction memory systems in semiconductor production. Establishing low-damage sputtering techniques to protect the multiple interfaces between sub-nm thick constituent layers delivers improved SAF properties could be key to data retention in high-density, sub-10 nm diameter magnetic memory arrays.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 04,2023

Researchers design 3D racetrack memory devices based on freestanding magnetic heterostructures

Researchers from Germany's Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics have reported a lift-off and transfer method to fabricate three-dimensional racetrack memories from freestanding magnetic heterostructures grown on a water-soluble sacrificial release layer.

The fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures is key to the development of next-generation nanoelectronic devices with a low device footprint. Magnetic racetrack memories encode data in a series of magnetic domain walls that are moved by current pulses along magnetic nanowires. To date, most studies have focused on two-dimensional racetracks.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 27,2022

Researchers investigate spin currents in chromium trihalides

Scientists have been looking for efficient methods to generate spin current. The photogalvanic effect, a phenomenon characterized by the generation of DC current from light illumination, is particularly useful in this regard. Studies have found that a photogalvanic spin current can be generated similarly using the magnetic fields in electromagnetic waves. However, there's a need for candidate materials and a general mathematical formulation for exploring this phenomenon.

Now, Associate Professor Hiroaki Ishizuka from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), along with his colleague Masahiro Sato, addressed these issues. In their recent study, they presented a general formula that can be used to calculate the photogalvanic spin current induced by transverse oscillating magnetic excitations. They then used this formula to understand how photogalvanic spin currents arise in bilayer chromium (Cr) trihalide compounds, namely chromium triiodide (CrI3) and chromium tribromide (CrBr3).

Read the full story Posted: Sep 05,2022

Researchers report milestone for antiferromagnetic spintronics

Researchers from the University of Tokyo and CREST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) have explored the world of spintronics and other related areas of solid state physics with a focus on antiferromagnets. The team has reported, in its recent study, the experimental realization of perpendicular and full spin–orbit torque switching of an antiferromagnetic binary state.

The team used the chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Sn, which exhibits the magnetization-free anomalous Hall effect owing to a ferroic order of a cluster magnetic octupole hosted in its chiral antiferromagnetic state. They fabricated heavy-metal/Mn3Sn heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy and introduce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the octupole using an epitaxial in-plane tensile strain. By using the anomalous Hall effect as the readout, the team demonstrated 100% switching of the perpendicular octupole polarization in a 30-nanometre-thick Mn3Sn film with a small critical current density of less than 15 megaamperes per square centimeter. Their theory is that the perpendicular geometry between the polarization directions of current-induced spin accumulation and of the octupole persistently maximizes the spin–orbit torque efficiency during the deterministic bidirectional switching process. The team's recent work provides a significant basis for antiferromagnetic spintronics.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 21,2022

Researchers develop new multiferroic heterostructure material with the highest spintronic performance in the world

A joint research group that included scientists from Osaka University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and University of York has achieved what is reportedly the world's highest level performance index (magnetic electrical coupling coefficient) in developing a high-performance interfacial multiferroic structure for new voltage information writing technology in spintronics devices. At the same time, they successfully demonstrated repeated switching of nonvolatile memory states by applying an electric field.

A challenge for magnetoresistive memory (MRAM), which is expected to become the next-generation of nonvolatile memory devices, is that it consumes a large amount of power because current is passed through its metallic magnetic material when information is written. The research group has demonstrated a high-performance interfacial multiferroic structure consisting of a high-performance metallic magnetic material and a piezoelectric material bonded together using their own technology, and developed a technology to switch the magnetization direction of the metallic magnetic material efficiently by simply applying voltage instead of an electric current.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 12,2022