Graphene

NRL scientists report the highest spin injection values yet measured for graphene

Researchers from the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) developed a new type of tunnel device structure in which both the tunnel barrier and transport channel are made from graphene. The researchers say that this device features the highest spin injection values yet measured for graphene, and this design could pave they way towards highly functional and scalable graphene electronic and spintronic devices.

The tunnel barrier is made from dilutely fluorinated graphene while the charge and transport layer is made from graphene. The researcher demonstrated tunnel injection through the fluorinated graphene, and lateral transport and electrical detection of pure spin current in the graphene channel.

Graphene can filter electrons according to the direction of their spin

Researchers from MIT discovered that under a powerful magnetic field and at very low temperatures, graphene can filter electrons according to the direction of their spin. This is something that cannot be done by any conventional electronic system - and may make graphene very useful for quantum computing.

it is known that when a magnetic field is turned on perpendicular to a graphene flake, current flows only along the edge, and in one direction (clockwise or counterclockwise, depending on the magnetic field orientation), while the bulk graphene sheet remains insulating. This is called the Quantum Hall effect.

Folding graphene in a fin-like structure opens a bandgap and produces a spin-polarized current

Researchers from the US, Singapore, Brazil and Ireland have theoretically shown that if you fold a graphene sheet in a fin-like structure and expose it to a magnetic field you open up a bandgap. This will also produce spin-polarized current, which should make it useful in Spintronics applications.

The researchers say that this folding can be easily achieved by depositing graphene on a substrate with periodic trenches.

Grain boundaries in certain 2D materials create nano magnets

Researchers from Rice University calculated that imperfections in certain 2D materials create the conditions by which nanoscale magnetic fields arise. According to the researchers this could lead towards new strategies in Spintronics research.

The researchers say that those grain boundaries in 2D semiconducting materials known as dichalcogenides (hybrids that combine transition metal and chalcogen atoms) can be magnetic. The researchers focused on molybdenum disulfide (MDS) grown using CVD. In graphene, the boundaries are weak points, but in dichalcogenides, they have unique properties, and they "squeeze magnetism out of nonmagnetic material".

Magnetic graphene at room temperature demonstrated

Researchers from UC Berkeley, Florida International University (FIU) and the Georgia Institute of Technology demonstrated for the first time the presence of magnetic properties in graphene nanostructures at room temperature. This could lead towards Spintronics applications.

To achieve this they functionalized the graphene with nitrophenyl. The researchers thus confirmed the presence of magnetic order in nanoparticle-functionalized graphene. The graphene was epitaxially grown at Georgia Tech, chemically functionalized at UC Riverside and studied at FIU and UC Berkeley.

Researchers manage to detect the electronic spin state of graphene contacted to a magnetic metal

Graphene is a promising Spintronics material, and a lot of research is dedicated to this new material. Detecting the electronic spin state of the material is not easy. Now researcher from Japan's Advanced Science Research Center, the Atomic Energy Agency and the National Institute for Materials Science developed a way to do it using a spin-polarized metastable helium beam.

Ethylene makes zigzag graphene nanoribbons possible for Spintronics applications

Researchers from Puerto Rico and China discovered that ethylene (C2H4) is the ideal terminal for zigzag graphene nanoribbons (zGNRs) - if you want to preserve the edge magnetism. This new research paves the way towards using zGNRs for Spintronics applications. 

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