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Graphene

New room-temperature tunnel device developed using graphene as tunnel barrier and transport channel

Researchers from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) developed a new type of room-temperature tunnel device structure in which the tunnel barrier and transport channel are both made of graphene.

NRL scientists use graphene as tunnel barrier for spintronics image

In this new design, hydrogenated graphene acts as a tunnel barrier on another layer of graphene for charge and spin transport. The researchers demonstrated spin-polarized tunnel injection through the hydrogenated graphene, and lateral transport, precession and electrical detection of pure spin current in the graphene channel. The team sasy that the spin polarization values are higher than those found using more common oxide tunnel barriers, and spin transport at room temperature.

EU's Graphene Flagship is looking for a partner company for spintronics research

The Graphene Flagship announced a €350,000 work package that explores the potential of graphene spintronics for future devices and applications. The GF is searching for a new partner company to support device development and commercialisation of graphene spintronics, by applying it in specific device architectures dedicated to commercially viable applications and determining the required figures of merits.

The project's budget is for the period 1 April 2016 – 31 March 2018, and includes devices which require optimized (long distance) spin transport, spin-based sensors, and new integrated two-dimensional spin valve architectures. The Graphene Flagship expects that at the start of the Horizon 2020 phase (April 2016), spin injection and spin transport in graphene and related materials will have been characterised and the resulting functional properties will have been understood and modeled.

A new method introduces magnetism to graphene while preserving its electronics properties

Researchers from the University of California at Riverside developed a way to introduce magnetism in graphene while still preserving electronics properties. This new method is superior to doping as it does not damage graphene's electronic properties.

magnetic graphene spintronics riverside university image

The research team used yttrium iron garnet grown using laser molecular beam epitaxy. They placed a single layer of graphene on an atom-thick sheet of yttrium iron garnet, and discovered that graphene “borrowed” the magnetic properties of the material. The researchers state that they managed to avoid interfering with graphene’s electrical transport properties by using the electric insulator compound.

Powerful magnet developed, can selectively control of the flow of spins

Researchers from Spain discovered a way of using lead atoms and graphene to create a powerful magnetic field by the interaction of the electrons' spin with their orbital movement. The scientists believe that this discovery could come in handy for spintronics applications.

The researchers laid a layer of lead on a layer of graphene, grown over an iridium crystal. This way, the lead forms 'islands' below the graphene and the electrons of this 2D material behave as if in the presence of a huge 80-tesla magnetic field, which allows for the selective control of the flow of spins. The scientists also state that under these conditions certain electric states are immune to defects and impurities.

Graphene discovered to have a unique spin relaxation mechanism

Researchers at the Spanish ICN2 Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group discovered that graphene has an unprecendented spin relaxation mechanism for non-magnetic samples. This may hold great promise for spintronics applications such as MRAM memory.

This mechanism is unique to graphene and may enable manipulating spin degree of freedom in future information-processing technologies.

Zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons suitable for spintronics applications

A zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon is the most magnetic type - and these ribbons are considered the most suitable ones for spintronics applications. Researchers from UCLA and Tohoku University developed a new self-assembly method to fabricate pristine zigzag graphene nanoribbons.

The researchers say they can control the ribbons length, edge configuration and location on the substrate.

A new topological insulator may enable fast spintronics devices

Researchers from the University of Utah developed a new topological insulator made from bismuth metal deposited on silicon. This material may be very suitable for quantum computers and fast spintronic devices.

This new material has the largest energy gap ever predicted. It can also be used alongside silicon so this material may be relatively easy to be used alongside current semiconductor technology.

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