NRL researchers produce spin-filtering at room temperature

Dec 22, 2016

Researchers from the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) demonstrated metallic spin filtering at room temperatures, using a ferromagnet-graphene-ferromagnet thin film junction device.

Spin filtering graphene junction (NRL)

Spin filtering has been theoretically predicted, and previously seen only for high-resistance structures at cryogenic temperatures. This is the first time that someone demonstrated the effect in room temperatures, and with very low resistance in arrays of multiple devices.

Researchers demonstrate the world's first spintronics-based AI

Dec 21, 2016

Researchers at Tohoku University demonstrated a spintronics-based artificial intelligence (AI) device. The researchers developed an artificial neural network using micro-scale magnetic spintronic device.

AI spintronics device photos (Tohoku Uni)

The researchers say that this spintronic device is capable of memorizing arbitral values between 0 and 1 in an analogue manner unlike the conventional magnetic devices, and thus perform the learning function, which is served by synapses in the brain. This is still an early stage (the researchers call this a proof-of-concept demo) but spintronics has a high potential to enable ultra low-power and fast neural-network devices.

New spintronics book: Non-Volatile In-Memory Computing by Spintronics

This book presents an an energy-efficient in-memory computing platform based on a spintronics design. It details the models of spin-transfer torque magnetic tunnel junction and racetrack memory and shows how spintronics could be a candidate for future data-oriented computing for storage, logic, and interconnect.

The book then describes an implementation of in-memory AES, Simon cipher and interconnect. Finally it demonstrates in-memory-based machine learning and face recognition algorithms.

Researchers demonstrate that thin-film Fe3O4 is a promising candidate for flexible spintronics

Nov 22, 2016

Researchers from National Chiao Tung University (NCTU) demonstrated that it is feasible to grow an epitaxial Fe3O4 film on a flexible muscovite. The thin film was characterized by several methods and found preserve the electrical and magnetic properties of Fe3O4. The researchers performed bending tests to confirm that the heterostructures retain the physical properties under repeated cycles. 

The researchers conclude their paper, saying that the material is a promising candidate for flexible spintronics devices, based on the tunneling magnetoresistance on the flexible muscovite.