UTSA reserachers use reduced graphene oxide to develop efficient spintronics interconnects

Researchers from the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) have developed a graphene-based "zero-power" interconnect that can present the loss of spin in Spintronics devices.

In the new architecture, the graphene nanomaterials are used as both the spin transport channel and the tunnel barrier. The researchers use reduced graphene oxide in a single-layer configuration. The researchers discovered that by controlling the amount of oxide on the graphene layers, the tune electrons’ conductivity can be fine-tuned.

Researchers report on electric field controlled motion in Skyrmions

Researchers from Shinshu University, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the University of Tokyo, Tsinghua University, Kyoto University and Nanyang Technological University have experimentally demonstrated a breakthrough in manipulation of skyrmions using only electric field.

The team, led by Professor Xiaoxi Liu of Shinshu University, designed and fabricated magnetic multilayer films in the form of racetracks where the thickness of the films had a slope. They demonstrated that many skyrmion bubbles can be created and directionally displaced about 10 micrometres by applying a voltage as low as 9 volt in a repeatable manner. They also found that the domain wall displacement and velocity induced by the variation of electric field are proportional to the absolute value of voltage.

Researchers develop a new technique for ultra-fast teraherz spintronics switching

Researchers from the University of Tokyo developed a method to partially switch between specific magnetic states at Thz frequencies. The researchers used short high-frequency pulses of terahertz radiation to flip the electron spins in ferromagnetic manganese arsenide (MnAs).

Tokyo University TeraHerz Spintronics MnAsSuch techniques have been attempted before, but the magnitude change in the magnetization of the MnAs was too small - but in this current research a 20% change was achieved. Such a technique could be used in the future to create Thz spintronics devices - one that operate at a much faster rate compared to today's Ghz electronics devices.

Researchers announce a breakthrough in pinning domain wall propagation

Researchers from Sultan Qaboos University in Oman, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz in Germany and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have experimentally demonstrated a breakthrough in one of the major problems blocking the adoption of magnetic domain wall memory.

When recording each fresh bit of information onto a racetrack, there is considerable uncertainty about where each magnetic domain starts and ends, and an incorrectly-written bit can easily lead to the corruption of bits. The team, led by Professor Rachid Sbiaa of Sultan Qaboos University, devised a method to overcome this difficulty by using a staggered nanowire (see figure below).

Researchers develop a 200Mhz spintronics-based microcontroller unit

Researchers from Japan's Tohoku University have developed a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology and STT-MRAM memory.

Spintronics 200Mhz MCU (Tohoku University) photo
The researchers used several new techniques to create an efficient and fast device. Each module's power supply is controlled independently, which eliminates wasteful power consumption, while a memory controller and a reconfigurable accelerator module are used to relax data transfer bottlenecks. These new techniques enabled the researchers to achieve ultra-lower power consumptioN (47.14 uW) at 200Mhz.

HZB researchers managed to switch superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain

Researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie Institute demonstrate how it is possible to induce a magnetic order on a small region of a material by using a small electric field, instead of commonly used magnetic field.

Spintronics by straintronics HZB

Te researchers used a wedge-shaped polycrystalline iron thin film deposited on top of a BaTiO3 substrate (a well-known ferroelectric and ferroelastic material). Given their small size, the magnetic moments of the iron nanograins are disordered with respect to each other, this state is known as superparamagnetism.

Researchers develop a way to inject an ultra-fast pulse of spin current

Researchers NTU, NUS, A*STAR and the Los Alamos National Lab have demonstrated that it is possible to inject an ultra-short pulse of spin current (less than a picosecond) from a metal to a semiconductor in a very efficient way.

Ultra-short laser pulses on cobalt - spin polarization photo

The researchers used a short laser pulse on cobalt (a magnetic material) - which generated a spin-polarized "swarm" of excited electrons. The spin-polarized electrons travel outside of the material - into adjacent materials. This creates an extremely efficient spin injection.

EU researchers fabricated graphene-based spintronics devices that utilize both electron charge and spin at room temperature

EU's Graphene Flagship project researchers fabricated graphene-based spintronics devices that utilize both electron charge and spin at room temperature.

The researchers demonstrated the spin’s feasibility for bridging distances of up to several micrometres - which they say could open the door to single-chip devices that integrate logic and memory.

Perovskites are promising as spintronic materials, researchers develop two new perovskite spintronics devices

Researchers from the University of Utah developed two spintronics devices based on perovskite materials. The researchers use these new devices to demonstrate the high potential of perovksites for spintronics systems. This is a followup to the exciting results announced in 2017 by the same group that showed advantages of perovskites for spintronics.

Perovskite spintronics LED wavelength (Utah University)

The researchers use an organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite material that has a heavy lead atom that features strong spin-orbit coupling and a long injected spin lifetime.The first device is a spintronic LED which works with a magnetic electrode instead of an electron-hole electrode. The perovskite LED lights up with circularly polarized electroluminescence.

Researchers produce spin wave overtones in spintronic oscillators

Researchers from the University of Gothenburg have succeeded to produce spin wave overtones for the first time, which could enable faster wireless data communication based on spintronics devices.

Spintronic oscillators are devices in which spin waves are used to generate microwave signals in the gigahertz range. The new research shows how it is possible to produce spintronic oscillators that strengthen spin wave signals in several steps. This makes it possible to generate very high microwave frequencies with short wavelengths for use in spintronics and magnonics.