Lead-Vacancy Centers in Diamonds could benefit spintronics

Researchers from Japan's Tokyo Institute of Technology, National Institute for Materials Science and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have found that lead-based vacancy centers in diamonds, that form after high-pressure and high-temperature treatment, are ideal for quantum networks, spintronics and quantum sensors.

The color in a diamond comes from a defect, or “vacancy,” where there is a missing carbon atom in the crystal lattice. Vacancies have long been of interest to electronics researchers because they can be used as ‘quantum nodes’ or points that make up a quantum network for the transfer of data. One of the ways of introducing a defect into a diamond is by implanting it with other elements, like nitrogen, silicon, or tin. In their recent study, the scientists from Japan demonstrated that lead-vacancy centers in diamond have the right properties to function as quantum nodes. “The use of a heavy group IV atom like lead is a simple strategy to realize superior spin properties at increased temperatures, but previous studies have not been consistent in determining the optical properties of lead-vacancy centers accurately,” says Associate Professor Takayuki Iwasaki of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), who led the study.

Researchers discover unconventional magnetism at the surface of Sr2RuO4

The attractive properties of Sr2RuO4, like its ability to carry lossless electrical currents and magnetic information simultaneously, make it a material with great potential for the development of future technologies like superconducting spintronics and quantum electronics. An international research team, led by scientists at the University of Konstanz, was recently able to answer one of the most interesting open questions on Sr2RuO4: why does the superconducting state of this material exhibit some features that are typically found in materials known as ferromagnets, which are considered being antagonists to superconductors?

New type of magnetism unveiled in an iconic material imageSpin polarized muon particles (red spheres with arrows) probing a new form of magnetism in the perovskite superconductor Sr2RuO4. Credit: Konstanz University

The team has found that the material hosts a new form of magnetism, which can coexist with superconductivity and exists independently of superconductivity as well.

Researchers discover how magnetism occurs in 2D ‘kagome’ metal-organic frameworks

Scientists from Australia's Monash University (affiliated with Fleet, the Australian research council funded ‘Arc Centre of Excellence in Future low-energy Electronics Technologies’) have discovered how magnetism occurs in 2D ‘kagome’ metal-organic frameworks, opening the door to self-assembling controllable nano-scale electronic and spintronic devices.

Kagome materials have repeating patterns of hexagons and smaller triangles, with the hexagons touching at their tips. The word 'Kagome' comes from Japanese, relating to a basket weaving pattern.

Researchers examine 'magnon' origins in 2D van der Waals magnets

Rice University researchers have confirmed the topological origins of magnons, magnetic features they discovered three years ago in a 2D material that could prove useful for encoding information in the spins of electrons.

The discovery provides a new understanding of topology-driven spin excitations in materials known as 2D van der Waals magnets. The materials are of growing interest for spintronics - for computation, storage and communications.

New research could help identify exotic quantum states and further promote spintronics

An international team of researchers has presented a finding that could help to identify exotic quantum states. The team seen strongly competing factors that affect an electron's behavior in a high-quality quantum material.

As an electron moves, its motion and spin can become linked through an effect known as spin–orbit coupling. This effect is useful because it offers a way to externally control the motion of an electron depending on its spin—a vital ability for spintronics. Spin–orbit coupling is a complex mix of quantum physics and relativity, but it becomes easier to understand by envisioning a round soccer ball. "If a soccer player kicks the ball, it flies on a straight trajectory," explains Denis Maryenko of the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science. "But if the player gives the ball some rotation, or spin, its path bends." The ball's trajectory and its spinning motion are connected. If its spinning direction is reversed, the ball's path will bend in the opposite direction.

Researchers demonstrate programmable dynamics of exchange-biased domain wall via spin-current-induced antiferromagnet switching

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have demonstrated a novel route to tune and control the magnetic domain wall motions employing combinations of useful magnetic effects inside very thin film materials. The research offers a new insight into spintronics and a step towards new ultrafast, ultrasmall, and power-efficient IT devices.

The new study demonstrates a new way to handle information processing using the movement of the magnetic states of the thin film device. It takes advantage of some unusual effects that occur when materials with contrasting types of magnetic material are squashed together. The research focuses on a device that combines ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic materials, in which the directions of electron spins align differently within the respective magnetic materials.

Researchers examine tension-free Dirac strings and steered magnetic charges in 3D artificial spin ice

Researchers at the University of Vienna have designed a 3D magnetic nanonetwork, where magnetic monopoles emerge due to rising magnetic frustration among the nanoelements, and are stable at room temperature.

The new three dimensional (3D) nano-network could mean a new era in modern solid state physics, with numerous applications in photonics, bio-medicine, and spintronics. The realization of 3D magnetic nano-architectures could enable ultra-fast and low-energy data storage devices.

New mechanism converts electrical current vortices into spin currents and vice versa

Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, together with their colleagues, have shown the conversion of a spin current into a rotating charge current vortex using numerical simulations.

This new approach can contribute to the emergence of energy efficient spintronic devices, as it helps to convert between electrical current vortices and a spin current and vice versa. The team came up with the idea of ​​exploiting the Rashba effect – an unusual phenomenon that was discovered in 1959. It occurs on some surfaces or interfaces between two materials where the atomic structure is no longer symmetrical. The Rashba effect causes the spin and the orbital motion of an electron to interact.

Uncovering hidden local states in a quantum material

Scientists have shown evidence of local symmetry breaking in a quantum material upon heating. They believe these local states are associated with electronic orbitals that serve as orbital degeneracy lifting (ODL) "precursors" to the titanium (Ti) dimers (two molecules linked together) formed when the material is cooled to low temperature. Understanding the role of these ODL precursors may offer scientists a path toward designing materials with the desired technologically relevant properties, which typically emerge at low temperatures.

“Not surprisingly, this low-temperature regime is well studied,” said Emil Bozin, a physicist in the X-ray Scattering Group of the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (CMPMS) Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory. “Meanwhile, the high-temperature regime remains largely unexplored because it’s associated with relatively high symmetry, which is considered uninteresting.”

Gate-controlled magnetic phase transition in a van der Waals magnet

An international collaboration led by RMIT has achieved record-high electron doping in a layered ferromagnet, causing magnetic phase transition with significant promise for future electronics.

Control of magnetism (or spin directions) by electric voltage is vital for developing future, low-energy high-speed nano-electronic and spintronic devices, such as spin-orbit torque devices and spin field-effect transistors. Ultra-high-charge, doping-induced magnetic phase transition in a layered ferromagnet allows promising applications in antiferromagnetic spintronic devices.