Researchers from Mainz University demonstrate the basic principles of ultra-fast and stable memory based on Mn2Au antiferromagnets

Researchers from Mainz University demonstrate the basic principles of ultra-fast and stable memory based on the antiferromagnet Mn2Au. Antiferromagnetic materials are challenging to manipulate and to implement a read-out process (of the Neel vector orientation on).

Crystal structure of Mn2Au with antiferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments.

Up until now, researchers were only able to use a single antiferromagnetic material - copper manganese arsenide (CuMnAs), but this material had several disadvantages. The new compound, manganese and gold (Mn2Au) offers for example ten times larger magnetoresistance and other important advantages including its non-toxic composition and the fact that it can be used even at higher temperatures.

Researchers discover a metallic antiferromagnet with a large magneto-optic Kerr effect

Researchers from the NIST in the US and the University of Tokyo have discovered a metallic antiferromagnet (Mn3Sn) that exhibits a large magneto-optic Kerr (MOKE) effect, despite a vanishingly small net magnetization at room temperature.

MOKE measurements in non-collinear antiferromagnets

Compared to ferromagnetic materials, metallic antiferromagnets allow for faster dynamics and more densely packed spintronic devices due to the weak interactions between antiferromagnetic cells. The researchers believe that such materials hold promise for future antiferromagnetic spintronic devices, where the magnetic state could transduced optically and switched either optically or by applying current.

Researchers discover a way to convert spin information into light signals

Reseaerchers from TU Delft developed a method to convert the spin information into light signals at room temperature. The researchers hope that this method could enable opto-spintronics devices.

The researchers used a device made from a thin silver thread and a 2D tungsten disulfide film on top. Using circularly polarised light, the researchers created excitons with a specific rotational direction (that could be intitialized using the rotational direction of the laser light). The excitons emit photons when they relax. And the emitted light contains the spin information.

Researchers determined the strength of the electron spin interactions with optical phonons in NiO

Researchers at UC Riverside have determined the strength of the electron spin interactions with the optical phonons in antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) crystals. The researchers say that Nio is a promising spintronics materials and the the strength of the electron spin interaction with phonons is important for future device development.

Nickel oxide electron spin research (UC riverside)

The researcher say that NiO has been studied for many years, but not fully understood. The new research used novel techniques to finally shed light on some of the long-standing puzzles surrounding this material.